What Are the Reasons to Establish a Massachusetts Pet Trust?

Many people who own a pet consider their pet to be a family member, and now Massachusetts law allows you to treat the pet in your will or trust as though it were a person.   A Massachusetts Pet Trust is not for everyone, but some people should consider it for the following reasons:

1. You should consider having a Massachusetts Pet Trust if your family members would take care of your pet for free, but are not a good choice due to allergies, attitude or time.

2. You should consider having a Massachusetts Pet Trust if you have chosen a Caretaker for your pet but that person needs to have access to funds for   the pet’s care during the pet’s lifetime, yet you don’t want that person inheriting all of the remaining funds after the pet dies. 

3. You should consider having a Massachusetts Pet Trust if your life expectancy is shorter than your pet because of your health, or because your  pet that has a long life expectancy.  For example, some parrots can live over 100 years.

4. You should consider having a Massachusetts Pet Trust if you live alone, and are concerned who would step in and care for your pet if you suddenly were hospitalized, became disabled or died.

5. You should consider having a Massachusetts Pet Trust if your pet is the type of animal that not just anyone can care for. For example, horses should not be put into the care of by someone who has little or no experience with them.

6. You should consider having a Massachusetts Pet Trust if you own more than one pet and want to keep your pets together if you are unable to care for them.

Posted by: Brian E. Barreira, Esq. / 18 Samoset Street, Plymouth, MA 02360 / 508-747-8282

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2 thoughts on “What Are the Reasons to Establish a Massachusetts Pet Trust?

  1. Pingback: New Massachusetts Pet Trust Law « Client Alerts: Estate Planning & Elder Law in Massachusetts

  2. Pingback: New Massachusetts Law Allows Trusts to Be Established to Take Care of Pets « Massachusetts Estate Planning, Probate & Elder Law

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